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Decades-old mystery

Decades-old mystery

Chamber hoping to ID local residents who made an impression in Midlands community in 1989 By Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com More »

Market at the Mill to open Thursday

Market at the Mill to open Thursday

By Jason Evans Staff Reporter jevans@thepccourier.com PICKENS — A Pickens plant site that has sat empty for several years will More »

Local wrestlers qualify for state

Local wrestlers qualify for state

By Bru Nimmons Staff Reporter bnimmons@thepccourier.com COUNTY — With winter sports nearly coming to an end, many of the county’s More »

Eva Aiken: Anchor for a rich, dysfunctional white family

Eva Aiken: Anchor for a rich, dysfunctional white family

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr. Special to The Courier Last week, for the celebration of Black History Month, we introduced More »

It don’t mean a thing if it isn’t green

It don’t mean a thing if it isn’t green

By Olivia Fowler For the Courier ofowler@thepccourier.com Broccoli appears in grocery stores year-round in varying degrees of freshness. Before buying, More »

Blue Flame football legend remembered for life on, off field

Blue Flame football legend remembered for life on, off field

By Jason Evans Staff Reporter jevans@thepccourier.com PICKENS — Pickens High School legend who helped lead the Blue Flame football team More »

 

Participants needed for cigarette study

By Jason Evans
Staff Reporter

jevans@thepccourier.com

PICKENS — Those looking to kick the habit may qualify to take part in a new research study at Behavioral Health Services of Pickens County.

Director of research Elizabeth Chapman said BHSPC collaborates with the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

“They’ve been awarded two studies and asked us to be a second site for those two studies,” she said.

Both studies involve the medication Chantix (varenicline), Chapman said.

She is seeking cigarette smokers for one trial.

“We’re looking for individuals who are currently smoking cigarettes who have a desire to quit,”

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I heard it on the party line

Does anybody remember the days before cellphones? The days when you could look up telephone numbers in something called a telephone book? And businesses were listed in the yellow pages?

There is an entire generation walking around today who doesn’t know what a rotary phone is. And they don’t know that when Southern Bell was the only telephone company, there was such a thing as party lines, when a number of families shared the same telephone line. The ring pattern let each family know who was being called.

If someone inadvertently left the phone off the hook, an entire line would be unusable until someone noticed. Unless, that is, everyone kept a bird dog whistle next to the phone in case of just such an

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Remembering the man who saved Stone Mountain

Well, what can you say about the man who saved Stone Mountain?

That would be my dad, Bobby D. Barnett.

As a young poultry scientist at Clemson University, he conducted research that proved that chickens didn’t really need to eat granite grit for their gizzards to grind up chicken feed, because it’s already ground up. That discovery put the Stony Mo Granite Grit Company out of business and saved the mountain they were grinding up from being fed to chickens.

That was just one of the many stories my dad told me and my brother Paul and sister Susan

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Start decluttering in a realistic way

There’s decluttering by the book, and then there’s realistic decluttering. Too often we follow the experts’ advice and end up unhappy with the result.

Clothing styles run in cycles. Pant legs go from wide to skin tight, and shirt hems go up and down. While it’s likely that your fairly new pair of wide leg pants might come back in style soon, the 2-foot-wide bell bottoms of the ‘70s probably won’t make a reappearance.

You thought you would like that magazine subscription you got two years ago. You read three issues and the other nine are in a stack that keep sliding off the coffee table. Out they go.

And what about that coffee table that you threatened to take to Goodwill ages ago because it’s

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Courier Obituaries 2-29-20

BOBBY DALE BARNETT

STONE MOUNTAIN, Ga. — Bobby Dale Barnett of Stone Mountain, Ga., died on Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020, at the age of 92. He was a former professor and department head at Clemson University.

Born on a farm near Elm Springs, Ark., on Aug. 12, 1927, he was the oldest son of Tommy Lewis and Mary Grace Boss Barnett.

He received BSA and MS degrees from the University of Arkansas in 1950 and 1954 and a Ph.D. in biochemistry and poultry science with emphasis in nutrition from the University of Wisconsin in 1957.

He and his wife, Bonnie, operated a hatchery in Springdale, Ark., from 1950-53.

He was employed at Clemson University from 1956 to 1988, serving as assistant professor, associate professor, professor and head of the Poultry Science Department. After a sabbatical at the University of Hawaii, he returned to Clemson as acting Associate Director of the South Carolina Experiment Station and later served as Assistant to the Vice President of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Dr. Barnett was active in the Poultry Science Association, a national professional organization. He served the association as a director, associate editor, annual program chairman and as secretary-treasurer.

He served as director, vice president and president of the American Poultry Historical Society and was author of a chapter of a history book issued by the society. He was a member of the American Institute of Nutrition and a life member of the World’s Poultry Science Association. He was the author or co-author of more than 100 scientific papers, as well as numerous articles for the popular press.

He was a U.S. Naval Reserve veteran of World War II, serving on the USS Marsh, a destroyer escort, in the Pacific theater during 1945-46.

He married Bonnie Porter in 1948, and they were parents of twin sons, Paul and Ronald, born in 1953, and a daughter, Susan, born in 1960.

He had a great appreciation for nature, enjoyed camping and growing flowers, especially rhododendrons, of which he became expert.

The Barnetts loved to travel, and after his retirement they traveled around the world, often with grandchildren.

During retirement, Barnett did extensive research on family history and compiled several books on the various branches of his and Bonnie’s families. He also took up watercolor painting as a hobby during his retirement years.

He and his wife split their time between St. Petersburg, Fla., Clemson and the Atlanta area during retirement, spending their last 12 years together at Park Springs, a retirement community adjacent to Stone Mountain Park. He shared his wife’s love of music and served as master of ceremonies, storyteller and part-time singer for an old-time music group she led at Park Springs called the Stone Mountaineers.

Surviving are his spouse, Bonnie; sons Paul (Janice) of Fort Myers, Fla., and Ron (Kathy) of Easley; daughter Susan Rohrabaugh (Mike) of Norcross, Ga.; seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. One grandson preceded him in death.

A memorial service was held Monday at Park Springs Community Hall in Stone Mountain, Ga., followed by a reception.

Burial will be in Woodland Cemetery on the Clemson campus. A service will be held in Clemson at a date and time yet to be determined.

Memorials in lieu of flowers may be made to SOAR Ministries at 1827 Preserve Creek Way, Loganville, GA 30052; Lilburn Co-op at 5329 Five Forks Trickum Road SW, Lilburn, GA 30047; or MC3 Church MUST Summer Lunch Program at 1227 Rockbridge Road, Suite 208-251, Stone Mountain, GA 30087.

CHRISTOPHER LANE PRICE

EASLEY — Mr. Christopher Lane Price, 46, went to be with his Lord and Savior on Friday, Feb. 21, 2020.

Mr. Price was born in Greenville County, and was the son to Ms. Barbara Ann Jordan and husband to his loving wife, Kathy Price. He was the son of the late James Gerald Price.

Mr. Price loved his family and loved having them around him. A retired Army veteran of the Iraq War, Christopher learned to love building things. He loved construction and also earned a bachelor’s degree from Florida Metropolitan University. He served the Army in the Military Police and as a sig support systems specialist. Nothing pleased him more than having his family in his presence.

Survivors include sons, Josh Price of Easley, Justin Price of Easley, Austin Price (Tami) of Easley and Zack Price of Walhalla; grandchild, Zaylea; brothers, James Price of

Eva Aiken: Anchor for a rich, dysfunctional white family

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.

Special to The Courier

Last week, for the celebration of Black History Month, we introduced the book “Hush Now, Baby,” by Angela Williams. Williams is a marvelous writer with a master’s degree in English from Duke University. She taught English and was in charge of the Writing Center at the Citadel. I was on the campus several times when Williams was there.

The book tells the story of Williams’ black nanny, Eva, in her wealthy and dysfunctional Lowcountry South Carolina home. The book’s author had Eva Aiken as a surrogate mother from her birth to marriage. Eva was working as a nurse’s aide at the hospital where Angela was born in 1941. Buster and Clara Lee Williams hired Eva on the spot to run the Williams household. Throughout Buster Williams’ alcoholism, infidelity, and abuse, the family had Eva as the anchor. This was happening as the struggle for civil rights continued in South Carolina. The book delineates the progression of the transformation occurring as the nanny runs the household of a wealthy white family whose political views regularly welcomed Strom Thurmond as a dear friend into their home.

Williams writes about how Eva was the one she could depend on in any circumstance. Buster

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Easley NJROTC orienteering takes Area Six competition

EASLEY — The Easley High School Navy JROTC orienteering team competed in the 12th annual Area Six orienteering championship at Raven Rock State Park in Lillington, N.C, on Saturday, Feb. 15.

Easley’s cadets did extremely well against the other 17 NJROTC and NNDCC units from North and South Carolinas that competed. There are 66 total NJROTC and NNDCC units in Area Six. Easley won the competition, beating the second-place finisher by 470

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Clemson Scouts collect food donations

CLEMSON — On a recent cold, windy Friday evening and unexpectedly snowy Saturday, Scouts and adults from Clemson Scouts BSA troops 161, 235 and 7235 collected more than 3,245 pounds of food and $240 in donations from customers outside the Central Walmart and the Clemson Walmart Neighborhood Market.

The food and money were donated to Clemson Community Care, the local food bank.

More than 35 Scouts and adults

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Courier Community Calendar 2-26-20

• Conservatives to meet on March 12

Conservatives of the Upstate’s next meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 12, in the large meeting room at Pizza Inn, located on Ann Street in Pickens. The meeting is open to the public. The guest speaker will be David Harrison, a candidate for Pickens County sheriff. The meeting will offer an opportunity to meet Harrison and ask any questions you have about why he is running and what his plans are for making Pickens County a safer place to live. For more information about Conservatives of the Upstate, find the group on Twitter or Facebook or visit conservativesoftheuostate.com.

• Local church plans ‘teach and preach’

The Church of Jesus Christ the Lamb of God is planning a teaching and preaching series featuring Apostle Glenn Petterson from Washington, running from March 5-9 at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. The Church of Jesus Christ The Lamb of God is located at 129 Winchester Mill Road in Pickens. For more information on the series, contact Larry Anderson at (864) 506-0689 or Harold Dobson at (816) 267-3237.

• Hannah-Patterson reunion is Sunday

The annual Hannah-Patterson family reunion is planned for 1 p.m. this Sunday, March 1.

The reunion will be held at the Mountain Grove Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. The church is

It don’t mean a thing if it isn’t green

By Olivia Fowler

For the Courier

ofowler@thepccourier.com

Broccoli appears in grocery stores year-round in varying degrees of freshness.

Before buying, check out the cut end of the stems. If they have a greyish look, don’t buy. That indicates the broccoli isn’t very fresh.

If possible, buy broccoli directly from someone who grows it.

It’s a vegetable we take for granted, but it is delicious and very good for you.