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Category Archives: Lifestyles

Clemson player faces reckless driving charge

Police: July wreck left mail carrier with ‘severe injuries’

By Riley Morningstar
and Greg Oliver
Courtesy The Journal
news@thepccourier.com

CLEMSON — Clemson football player Fred Davis turned himself in to police Sunday morning after being charged with reckless driving after authorities said he was driving 115 mph before hitting a U.S. Postal Service carrier last month.

Davis, 19, was booked in the city jail and released on a $500 personal recognizance bond after an investigation

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Current state law

Campos said current South Carolina law does not have an enhanced penalty for reckless driving that results in serious bodily injury, but the S.C. House of Representatives is looking to add “great bodily injury” as an enhancement.

CThese egregious and aggressive driving acts that result in serious injury to another need to have an appropriate penalty,T Campos said in a statement.   In most cases, the injured suffer much pain, multiple medical procedures, lengthy recovery times and whose freedom to live life injury free are taken from them. The offender, especially if they are not hurt, currently only have a few hurdles to navigate and get to live life freely, while the injured do not.”

Campos said with advances in modern medicine, many injuries do not meet the definition of “great bodily injury.” He is advocating for a more inclusive definition for the enhanced penalty.

“The legislature’s current proposed bill is a step in the right direction, but will not account for serious injuries that are not permanent,” Campos said.

 

Court date scheduled

A Clemson Municipal Court official told The Journal on Monday afternoon Davis is scheduled to appear before a judge on Sept. 1. If he requests a jury trial, the official said it will happen at a “much later date” due to a backlog in cases.

 

rmorningstar@upstatetoday.com | (864) 973-6685

goliver@upstatetoday.com | (864) 973-6687

‘Your community supports you’

Farm hosts appreciation dinner for local law enforcement officers

By Jason Evans
Staff Reporter
jevans@thepccourier.com

SUNSET — Pickens County law enforcement officers enjoyed a night out Saturday, thanks to local business Arabella Farm and corporate and community support.

Arabella Farm owner Ken Smith, his family and staff began planning a way to thank area law enforcement around four months ago, he said.

Saturday evening, the wedding and event venue in Sunset hosted law enforcement members and their spouses for an appreciation dinner.

The idea for the dinner came after Smith and his wife, Sharon, were watching the news one day and saw how law enforcement were mischaracterized, he said.

Welcoming their guests to the venue, Smith shared a story from his childhood, when after buying candy for a friend, he realized he no longer

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Teamwork turns the corner on an insect invasion in South Carolina Lowcountry

Courtesy Clemson University
news@thepccourier.com

CHARLESTON — An aptly named invasive pest, the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) snuck into South Carolina for the first time in 2020 and established a toehold in Lowcountry hardwood trees.

A toehold will be all the insect gets if a coalition of federal and state officials, local property owners and Clemson researchers has its way. The team has organized one of the Palmetto State’s largest and most coordinated responses to an invasive species, leading to a recently expanded quarantine of 76.4 square miles in Charleston County and a sliver of Dorchester.

“We feel pretty confident that the ALB is contained within the area,” said Steven Long, assistant director of Clemson

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SC banning sales of invasive Bradford pear, 3 other species

Courtesy Clemson University
news@thepccourier.com

CLEMSON — South Carolina will become only the second state in the United States — and the first in the Southeast — to ban the nursery sale of Bradford pear trees and any other pear trees grown on the

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Serving & learning

PICKENS — From June 14-18, 23 cadets from the Pickens High School JROTC program participated in the Junior Cadet Leadership Challenge.

Consistent with the JROTC mission to “motivate young people to be better citizens,” the cadets spent an intensive week serving the community, improving their physical

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By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr. Special to The Courier

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.
Special to The Courier

Last week, we took a glimpse at the Keowee Valley in the early 1700s through the journal of Col. George Chicken. He was sent by British authorities to make sure the Cherokees of Keowee gave their allegiance to England. The French were trying to sway the Cherokees toward them. Both King Crow of the Cherokees and Col. Chicken spoke hyperbolically about the “beloved men of the English.” Col. Chicken wrote to his boss, Royal Governor Arthur Middleton, that the Cherokees were as glad to see him “as if I had come from above.” As with most foreign affairs, things can change.

In 1758, tensions grew between the Cherokees and Britain. The Cherokees took horses in Virginia that they allegedly

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Reflecting on the Keowee Valley area’s Native American heritage

 

Reflecting on the Keowee Valley area’s Native American heritage

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.
Special to The Courier

My mother’s name was Grace Moody Cloer. My maternal Moody ancestors came early to the Keowee, “Place of the Mulberries.” My great-great-great-great-grandfather, Daniel Moody (Papa Daniel), and his son, Martin, bought land on the Toxaway River, Devils Fork, Crow Creek, Little River and along the Keowee River.

My Cherokee bloodline is through my great-grandmother Anna Laura Cloer. She was a namesake of her grandmother

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A day to celebrate

After the COVID-19 pandemic forced the cancellation of the 2020 events, the long-awaited 2021 versions of the Pickens Azalea Festival and Issaqueena Festival in Six Mile went off without a hitch on Saturday, as beautiful weather made for large crowds at both annual spring celebrations. The festivals featured food, music, rides, arts and craft vendors and more fun for the whole family. Photos by Rocky Nimmons and Kerry Gilstrap

The pioneers of Pickens County

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.

Special to The Courier

For the last two weeks, we have focused on the battle for civil rights nationally in the USA. Now we want to focus more on Pickens County. We obviously can’t focus on all the civil rights leaders. Again, I will focus on some of the pioneers whom I remember.

I entered Clemson University in the 1960s, beginning my work on a masters degree. There had been a young African-American, Harvey Gantt, who had been admitted after suing Clemson, and after having become the first African-American enrolled at a previously all-white institution in South Carolina.

Harvey Gantt: Activist, Pioneer, Architect, Mayor

Harvey Gantt was born in Charleston, where his father was employed at a shipyard. Harvey’s father was active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and the family discussed discrimination and civil rights openly

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Seeds of Change

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.

Special to The Courier

For celebrating Black History Month, I would like to focus nationally and locally on some pioneers who pushed forward in the nation and in Pickens County when we all were broadening our understanding. Firrst, I need to set the stage by presenting some of the most critical happenings in America that brought on such incredible change.

Brown v. Board of Education, 1954

I remember vividly the presidency of Gen. Dwight Eisenhower from 1953-1961. Eisenhower drew large support from patriotic Americans, my parents included. My parents and grandparents were Roosevelt Democrats. They, and others in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, lived through the Great Depression, where a breakfast often consisted of unsweetened pumpkin. They saw benefits of the New Deal of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. However, most of the mountain people

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