AdvertiseHereH

Category Archives: Lifestyles

This is not a drill

There is plenty of doom and gloom about the coronavirus out there, so how about a little good news for a change? The good news is there is something that actually works. It’s not a cure-all drug, a vaccine (which is at best a year away) or some snake oil concoction you can buy on the internet. It’s called social distancing, and it is easier and more effective than you might think.

Let’s look first at what social distancing is and what it is not. It is not locking yourself up in the house for some undetermined length of time. You can go outside and take a walk around the neighborhood. You can sit on the porch and watch the squirrels and the birds and your neighbors as they pass by. You can drive to a park, stroll a well-worn path and commune with nature. You can go to the store to get groceries, or to the gas station to fill up the car, or to the drug store to get your medicines, or to big box stores to replenish your supply of all those things essential to life.

The term social distancing actually refers to two things. First, it does indeed mean spending most of your time at home, but you can avoid cabin fever or just plain old boredom by venturing out from time to time. More about how to safely do that later on. The other aspect of social distancing is maintaining a safe distance of six to eight feet between you and other people at all times and in all places.

Your goal in social distancing should be to make your home your safe space, the one place where you can be reasonably certain that you will not come in contact with the coronavirus. To make that happen, you will have to do something that goes against our natural instinct, the very fiber of our being. Humans are social creatures, and here in the South, we are some of the friendliest, most hospitable and gracious people on the planet. Our southern hospitality is legendary. Lord knows I love the South and thank the good Lord every day that I grew up where I did, and that I was raised the way I was.

Regardless of where you are from or how you were raised, in order to create your safe space, in order to protect yourself, you are going to have to make sure that someone does not bring the coronavirus into your sanctuary. This means that you should not invite or allow anyone, other than

‘Her rightful place’

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.

Special to The Courier

For the last three weeks, we have been reviewing the book “Hush Now, Baby,” by Angela Williams from a wealthy, white South Carolina family in Berkeley County. We have reviewed this book because it focuses on an African-American nanny, Eva, in the Williams household during segregation, passage of laws giving civil rights to all and the integration of races in South Carolina and the United States.

Social Justice and Civil Rights

Social justice and civil rights are very recent phenomena, relatively speaking. The first of Eva’s African people were brought and sold at auction about 400 years ago in the United States. That’s when the very first black slaves were kidnapped in Africa. When we move forward to the American Civil War over slavery, and its conclusion on April 9, 1865, we see how recent the fight over social justice has been. Complete segregation, and all the recent federal laws requiring integration, have occurred in Angela Williams and my lifetimes, and also in the lifetimes of most people reading this.

If the Bible Belt has been slow to embrace social justice, civil rights and intermarriage, some of the reasons must be related to how recent these changes are. Attitudes, especially those that are

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

Black nanny helps author weather the storm of life in wealthy Lowcountry family

The author, Angela Williams, in her marvelous book “Hush Now, Baby,” writes much about South Carolina politics that were affecting black people’s lives as her beloved African-American nanny tried to live in two worlds during very trying times. The author and I are both in our 70s. We lived during segregation and Jim Crow laws that required different schools, beaches, motels and bathrooms. It was our generation that saw civil rights bestowed with the integration of schools and drinking fountains. Williams was from a rich Lowcountry family who had a very close friend, Strom Thurmond. Throughout the book, it was the beloved nanny, Eva, who saw to the needs of Angela Williams, and acted as her real mother.

“While Clara Lee (her mother) sipped cocktails and flirted with Buster (her father), Eva nurtured

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

Eva Aiken: Anchor for a rich, dysfunctional white family

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.

Special to The Courier

Last week, for the celebration of Black History Month, we introduced the book “Hush Now, Baby,” by Angela Williams. Williams is a marvelous writer with a master’s degree in English from Duke University. She taught English and was in charge of the Writing Center at the Citadel. I was on the campus several times when Williams was there.

The book tells the story of Williams’ black nanny, Eva, in her wealthy and dysfunctional Lowcountry South Carolina home. The book’s author had Eva Aiken as a surrogate mother from her birth to marriage. Eva was working as a nurse’s aide at the hospital where Angela was born in 1941. Buster and Clara Lee Williams hired Eva on the spot to run the Williams household. Throughout Buster Williams’ alcoholism, infidelity, and abuse, the family had Eva as the anchor. This was happening as the struggle for civil rights continued in South Carolina. The book delineates the progression of the transformation occurring as the nanny runs the household of a wealthy white family whose political views regularly welcomed Strom Thurmond as a dear friend into their home.

Williams writes about how Eva was the one she could depend on in any circumstance. Buster

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

Living in two worlds

The story of a black nanny

in segregated South Carolina

—– Part 1—–

By Dr. Thomas Cloer, Jr.

Special to The Courier

To celebrate Black History Month, I would highly recommend “Hush Now, Baby,” by a wonderful South Carolina writer, Angela Williams. This book is a read I’ve been wanting to undertake for a while.

Angela Williams is an educator and writer close to my age in her 70s. She taught English at the Citadel for 20 years, and I was on Citadel’s campus several times when she was there. I had a colleague at the Citadel who invited me to be a speaker there on different occasions. My wife and I were treated royally as we lodged and took our meals in the Officers’ Quarters.

Angela is from a rich family in Berkeley County. The Williams family held vast amounts of

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

Snow Much Fun!!!

Kimberly Hampton’s mother talks about daughter’s legacy

By Jason Evans
Staff Reporter

jevans@thepccourier.com

EASLEY — Ann Hampton did not know what a Gold Star Mother was until she became one.

“Back in World War I, mothers started hanging gold stars in their windows when they lost a child in the military,” she said. “There were a lot of gold stars hanging then.”

In 1928, the official American Gold Star Mothers organization started.

“The mission was to support grieving families, provide services to wounded soldiers,” Hampton said.

The Gold Star Mothers have “a mutual bond,” she said.

“We don’t want anyone else to join,” Hampton said. “We don’t want to be a member, but unfortunately we are.

The mothers “stand tall,” she said.

“We honor our children,” Hampton said. “We honor their sacrifice.”

Hampton spoke last week at the Easley Friends of the Library’s annual meeting, held at the Capt. Kimberly

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

Eastatoee Valley historical marker unveiled in Sunset

By Jason Evans
Staff Reporter

jevans@thepccourier.com

SUNSET — The Pickens County Historical Society unveiled the county’s newest historical marker, one that celebrates the Eastatoee Valley and the people who have dwelt in the area for thousands of years.

“This marker is extraordinarily significant,” PCHS senior vice oresident Wayne Kelley said at the start of the unveiling Wednesday morning.

The marker is located on Cleo Chapman Highway at Shooting Tree Ridge Road.

PCHS Blue Wall vice president Dennis Chastain said the society has been working on the

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

WHY WE CELEBRATE

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday celebrates the life and legacy of a man who brought hope and healing to America. We commemorate as well the timeless values he taught us through his example — the values of courage, truth, justice, compassion, dignity, humility and service that so radiantly defined Dr. King’s character and empowered his leadership. On this holiday, we commemorate the universal, unconditional love, forgiveness and nonviolence that empowered his revolutionary spirit.

We commemorate Dr. King’s inspiring words, because his voice and his vision filled a great void in our nation, and answered our collective longing to become a country that truly lived by its noblest principles. Yet, Dr. King knew that it wasn’t enough just to talk the talk, that he had to walk the walk for his words to be credible. And so we commemorate on this holiday the man of action, who put his life on the line for freedom and justice every day, the man who braved threats and jail and beatings and

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login

 

REMEMBERING DR. KING

Each January, Americans remember and reflect on the life of a man who stood up for his rights and the rights of millions of American citizens. Martin Luther King Jr. ultimately lost his life fighting for the rights of black Americans, and his courage is celebrated every year on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

King was a Baptist minister and a social rights activist who helped shape the American Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. King seemed destined for greatness at an early age and studied medicine and law at Morehouse College. However, he chose to follow in his father’s footsteps and make a career out of his beliefs and religion. According to History.com, King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania, where he earned a Bachelor of Divinity degree, won a prestigious fellowship

You must be logged in to view this content.

Subscribe Today or Login